San Francisco Giants’ Bizarre Even-Year Postseason Magic

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Something strange has gone on with the San Francisco Giants ever since 2010. They seem to have some sort of strange playoff magic going on that only seems to work in even numbered years. In 2010, 2012, and now 2014, the Giants have made it to the World Series, and won in 2010 and 2012. While in odd numbered years, 2011 and 2013, the Giants have had disastrous seasons and not even made the playoffs. While on the surface this appears to be some sort of voodoo magic, there are a few common threads in their even-year success.

It’s no secret that in sports, having your best player healthy and producing at a high level is conducive to success. For the Giants, that player is catcher Buster Posey. He is one of the games brightest young stars and is the engine that makes the Giant’s offense go. With that in mind, observe this breakdown of his numbers over the past 5 seasons.

Split G PA HR BA OBP SLG OPS WAR
2011 and 2013 193 780 19 .292 .371 .435 .806 6.9
2010, 2012 and 2014 403 1658 64 .318 .378 .515 .893 16.4

As you can see, the health and production of Posey has been far superior in the even numbered years as opposed to the odd numbered ones. And as Posey goes, so goes the Giants.

Another factor in the Giant’s odd-even pattern has been the pattern of general manager Brian Sabian. In the wake of the team’s two championships, Sabian’s priority has been to keep the band together, and do little else to add more talent to the team. However, after their lost seasons in 2011 and 2013, Sabian went out and added many players that would become core contributors to the championship runs the following year. The Giant’s farm system has also coincidently borne fruit in their championship years as well, giving them Posey and pitcher Madison Bumgarner in 2010, Brandon Belt and Brandon Crawford in 2012, and this season, Joe Panik and Andrew Susac joined the party.

But regardless of the year, the Giants have one of the best managers in baseball in the dugout in Bruce Bochy. He is as strong a leader as they come and knows exactly how to get the most out of all his players. “If your leader is a rock as solid as Bochy is, if your leader is as sharp as he is, it leaks into the team,” Pence said before the NLCS, via Daniel Brown of the San Jose Mercury News. “We believe in him and we have faith. And I think a lot can be said for faith.” Bochy has a great deal of trust in his younger players, and that does worlds of good for their confidence and development.

[via  Bleacher Report]

Tommy Messina | News Cult

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